September262014

My mom makes me feel bad for working and going to school.

She makes me go crazy.

I’m tired of feeling bad for living my life how I want.

September242014

jaclcfrost:

fun fact

  • yelling at someone when they’re crying? funnily enough, that’s probably not going to make them stop. neither is insulting them. especially if the insult has to do with the fact that they’re crying. those are the things that are probably going to make them want to cry more. and feel worse. wow! that’s fun

(via ay-mariposita)

9PM

Nobody knows that I cry every day knowing I won’t be able to afford college after winter quarter.

My mom says it’s my fault for not saving enough.

September202014
12PM

dear 98% of the people that follow me that dont talk to me

syupon:

tamaraldbrennan:

Who are you

Whats your favorite color

Favorite ship

Favorite ice cream flavor

Do you have a cat

Thank

reblogging again bc I already got some from really cute people, but it makes me unreasonably happy to read these from you SO KEEP ON SENDING THEM 

(Source: 314eater, via tragically-magically)

12PM

Early in my freshman year, my dad asked me if there were lots of Latinos at school. I wanted to say, “Pa, I’m one of the only Latinos in most of my classes. The other brown faces I see mostly are the landscapers’. I think of you when I see them sweating in the morning sun. I remember you were a landscaper when you first came to Illinois in the 1950s. And look, Pa! Now I’m in college!”

But I didn’t.

I just said, “No, Pa. There’s a few Latinos, mostly Puerto Rican, few Mexicans. But all the landscapers are Mexican.”

My dad responded, “¡Salúdelos, m’ijo!”

So when I walked by the Mexican men landscaping each morning, I said, “Buenos días.”

Recently, I realized what my dad really meant. I remembered learning the Mexican, or Latin American, tradition of greeting people when one enters a room. In my Mexican family, my parents taught me to be “bien educado” by greeting people who were in a room already when I entered. The tradition puts the responsibility of the person who arrives to greet those already there. If I didn’t follow the rule as a kid, my parents admonished me with a back handed slap on my back and the not-so-subtle hint: “¡Saluda!”

I caught myself tapping my 8-year-old son’s back the other day when he didn’t greet one of our friends: “Adrian! ¡Saluda!”

However, many of my white colleagues over the years followed a different tradition of ignorance. “Maleducados,” ol’ school Mexican grandmothers would call them.

But this Mexican tradition is not about the greeting—it’s about the acknowledgment. Greeting people when you enter a room is about acknowledging other people’s presence and showing them that you don’t consider yourself superior to them.

When I thought back to the conversation between my dad and me in 1990, I realized that my dad was not ordering me to greet the Mexican landscapers with a “Good morning.”

Instead, my father wanted me to acknowledge them, to always acknowledge people who work with their hands like he had done as a farm worker, a landscaper, a mechanic. My father with a 3rd grade education wanted me to work with my mind but never wanted me to think myself superior because I earned a college degree and others didn’t.

Ray Salazar, Mexican etiquette some white people need to learn on dad’s 77th birthday. (via sittyeight)

(Source: frijoliz, via enriquedlcm)

September132014

My job is stealing my soul.

September122014

musclemandz:

I don’t want my life to be a series of “I shouldn’t have eaten that.”

Hell no.

If it tasted good, if I enjoyed it, that’s all that matters.

I’m not a slave to food.

(Source: runningmandz, via find-greatness)

September112014

queenofcarrrotflowers:

watch out world!! gilmore girls will be on netflix next month!!!!!!!!

11AM

(Source: heyyyybrother, via adamevergreen)

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